"This work is unlike any other, in its range of rich, conjuring imagery and its dexterity, its smart voice. Carroll-Hackett doesn’t spare us—but doesn’t save us—she draws a blueprint of power and class with her unflinching pivot: matter-of-fact and tender." —Jan Beatty

Posts tagged ‘poetry collections’

Monday Must Read! Haunted City by Julie Brooks Barbour

Julie Brooks Barbour is the author of two full-length collections, Haunted City (2017) and Small Chimes(2014), both from Kelsay Books, and three chapbooks, including Beautifully Whole (Hermeneutic Chaos Press, 2015) and Earth Lust (Finishing Line Press, 2014). Her poems have recently appeared in South Dakota Review, Glass: A Journal of Poetry, Whale Road Review, and The Indianapolis Review. She is co-editor of Border Crossing and Poetry Editor at Connotation Press: An Online Artifact. She teaches writing at Lake Superior State University and is a Guest Artist Mentor for Wilson College’s MFA Program.

Purchase Haunted City here! 

Visit Julie’s website here! 

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Praise for Haunted City! 

Julie Brooks Barbour’s exciting new book, Haunted City, occupies the edge between poetry and fable, dream and nightmare. These vivid prose poems, themselves between genres, construct a terrifying metropolis of desire. -Stuart Dischell, author of Backwards Days and Dig Safe 

This book of prose poems, or perhaps it is a short novel with poetic lines backlit by lightning, is mysterious and involving, indeed haunting. Barbour is a true poet with a muse at her side. As she explains, what she has created is “really what someone else created when I relinquished control.”-Kelly Cherry, author of The Life and Death of Poetry: Poems

Presented in brief glimpses of lyric prose, an extended sequence of image-driven evocations, Barbour gives us experimental writing at its very best, offering innovations in form and technique that are thought-provoking as they are charged with affect and suspense.  This is an accomplished book by a truly remarkable writer.  -Kristina Marie Darling, author of Scorched Altar:  Selected Poems & Stories 2007-2014

 

Happy Reading!

Monday Must Read! Crone by Clare L. Martin

Clare L. Martin’s Seek the Holy Dark was selected as the 2017 Louisiana Series of Cajun and Creole Poetry by Yellow Flag Press. Her debut, Eating the Heart First, was published in 2012 by Press 53. Martin founded and edits the poetry magazine, MockingHeart Review. She lives in Louisiana with her husband and daughter.

Visit Clare’s website 

Read excerpts and purchase this beautiful book here from NixesMate

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Praise for Crone

“Clare Martin’s Crone is a feast for eyes and ears, seductive in its use of both imagery and sound. Celebrating the sometimes terrifying, sometimes life-giving teachings of the wise woman,  Crone evokes a woman’s coming-to-power, an epic “cronesong” of spells and potions in the form of poetry.”
–Sheryl St.Germain, author of The Small Door of Your Death.
Clare Martin’s Crone glows equal parts magic, music, and muscle. Her lines are laced with ambergris and jasmine, ghosts and wolfbreath. I would call Martin’s art a gorgeous dream, but that would ignore the blood, bone, and heart that drive this book at its core. Crone is the creation of a poet at the height of her powers, in full voice, and mesmerizing. Immerse yourselves in these lines, friends. You’ll rise from their waters cleansed and awed.  —Jack B. Bedell, author of No Brother, This Storm, Poet Laureate, State of Louisiana, 2017-2019
“Clare L. Martin is a mysterious spellcaster. CRONE is a lush and dizzying monster of a poem. Coming through it made me see the world anew.”
Luis Alberto Urrea, author of House of Broken Angels

Monday Must Read! The Crossing Over by Jen Karetnick

 Jen Karetnick is the author of four full-length poetry collections, including The Treasures That Prevail (Whitepoint Press, September 2016), finalist for the 2017 Poetry Society of Virginia Book Prize, and The Burning Where Breath Used to Be (David Robert Books, 2020). The winner of the 2017 Hart Crane Memorial Poetry Contest, the 2016 Romeo Lemay Poetry Prize, and the 2015 Anna Davidson Rosenberg Prize, she is also the author of four other poetry chapbooks, including Bud Break at Mango House, winner of the 2008 Portlandia Prize. Her work has recently appeared or is forthcoming in Crab Orchard Review, JAMA, Michigan Quarterly Review, The Missouri Review, Ovenbird, Salamander, and Tampa Review. She is co-founder/co-editor of the daily online literary journal, SWWIM Every Day. Jen received an MFA in poetry from University of California, Irvine, and an MFA in fiction from University of Miami. She works as the dining critic for MIAMI Magazine and as a freelance writer and trade book author. Her fourth cookbook, Ice Cube Tray Recipes: 75 Easy and Creative Kitchen Hacks for Freezing, Cooking, and Baking with Ice Cube Trays (Skyhorse Publishing), is forthcoming May 2019.

Find her on Twitter @Kavetchnik or see https://jkaretnick.com.

Purchase this beautiful book here!

The Crossing Over Cover

About The Crossing Over

The winner of the 2018 Split Rock Review Chapbook Competition, The Crossing Over is 21 consecutive poems about the migrant experience in the Mediterranean, narrated from the boat’s point of view. It begins with the crafting of the vehicle – the birth of its voice – and ends with its destruction. As much participant as it is victim, the boat is the lens through which the reader sees all that happens to the refugees: smuggling, hunger and thirst, rape, drowning, labor in open international waters, terrorism, organ stealing, deportation, and repatriation – and, for some, survival in a new country.

Poems in The Crossing Over were included or are forthcoming in literary magazines such as Construction, The Evansville Review, Michigan Quarterly Review, One, and Salamander, and have won or been nominated for awards such as ICON’s Hart Crane Memorial Poetry Contest, Brittany Noakes Competition, Locked Horn Press Poetry Prize, Headway Quarterly Writing Contest, and Best of the Net.

Praise for The Crossing Over

About The Crossing Over, poet M.B. McLatchey, author of the prize-winning collection, The Lame God, writes, “This book is our most awaited guide for understanding what it means to be human among humans – or as the poet says, for learning the rites for search and rescue. As she says in ‘Internment’: ‘Before the cleansing of all that is corporeal, the rites for search and rescue.’ And, in order to command this search, Karetnick, like the most masterful of guides and poets, is willing to lead us and to look where most of us cannot. For this book, for this guide, this poet, we are right to be grateful.’”

Award-winning poet Denise Duhamel writes, “Boat as metaphor for what we carry. Boat as vessel (woman), boat as adventure (man and conquest). Boat as witness to abominations that befall immigrants and refugees. Boat lost at sea, “a brief dream the ocean/once had”—as we all are sometimes lost. Boat as death, driven by Charon. Jen Karetnick’s The Crossing Over is a political, moral journey, a tour de force built by sonnets, lists, a ghazal, a concrete poem, a pantoum, and literary magic.”

 

Monday Must Read! Drifting in Awe by Larry Thacker

Larry D. Thacker is a Kentuckian poet, writer, and artist now hailing from Johnson City, Tennessee with his wife, Karin, and their cat, Abraham Lincoln. A five year veteran of the US army and having served fifteen years in the realm of student services in higher education, he finally paid heed to the voices of adventurous reason and will soon complete his poetry and fiction MFA at West Virginia Wesleyan College. He earned his bachelor of history, master of education in counseling, and education specialist degree from Lincoln Memorial University, home of the Mountain Heritage Literary Festival. Besides Drifting in Awe, he is the author of Mountain Mysteries: The Mystic Traditions of Appalachia (2007), and the chapbooks Voice Hunting (2011) and Memory Train (2015). His poems have appeared in over a hundred journals and magazines.

Keep up with what’s happening at http://www.larrydthacker.com

and on Instagram at: thackalachia

Buy this beautiful book here!   

Also, keep an eye out for Larry’s forthcoming collection, Grave Robber Confessional, later this year, from one of my favorites, FutureCycle Press. 

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Praise for Drifting in Awe

The poems in this resonant book offer a strong, hands-on encounter with the world as it is, with the weather, geography, the trees, our fellow creatures. Attending to the muscular and physical realities of the local world, however, rightly leads these poems to the lesser-known and less-certain wonders of the metaphysical, to the apprehension, as far as the mind can reach, of a meaning beyond the limits of physical knowledge. What’s out there beyond the fog rising in a cove? What questions should we ask, only to voice them, knowing they have no ready answer? That strange little paradox is why we have poetry at all, and here is a fine book to prove that point, with elegance, and with elegant reserve.

—Maurice Manning

Larry Thacker writes of the natural world and what hovers on the edge of consciousness. Entities “seen in the corner of the eye” or “the sound of the sun” might manifest if one becomes still enough to see and hear. Drifting in Awe, gives us a manual for doing just that. In his first full length collection, Thacker invites us to be still and let that world come to us if we are brave enough. 

—Jane Hicks

Monday Must Read! Of Poetry and Protest: From Emmett Till to Trayvon Martin

poetry-and-protestThis week’s recommendation is a collection, a vital gathering of voices that should be in every poet’s library, in every classroom where we talk poetry: Of Poetry and Protest: From Emmett Till to Trayvon Martin,compiled by Phil Cushway and edited by Michael Warr.

This stunning work illuminates today’s black experience through the voices of our most transformative and powerful African American poets.

Included in this extraordinary volume are the poems of 43 of America’s most talented African American wordsmiths, including Pulitzer Prize–winning poets Rita Dove, Natasha Tretheway, Yusef Komunyakaa, and Tracy K. Smith, as well as the work of other luminaries such as Elizabeth Alexander, Ishmael Reed, and Sonia Sanchez. Included are poems such as “No Wound of Exit” by Patricia Smith, “We Are Not Responsible” by Harryette Mullen, and “Poem for My Father” by Quincy Troupe. Each is accompanied by a photograph of the poet along with a first-person biography. The anthology also contains personal essays on race such as “The Talk” by Jeannine Amber and works by Harry Belafonte, Amiri Baraka, and The Reverend Dr. William Barber II, architect of the Moral Mondays movement, as well as images and iconic political posters of the Black Lives Matter movement, Malcolm X, and the Black Panther Party. Taken together, Of Poetry and Protest gives voice to the current conversation about race in America while also providing historical and cultural context. It serves as an excellent introduction to African American poetry and is a must-have for every reader committed to social justice and racial harmony.”

Buy Of Poetry and Protest: From Emmett Till to Trayvon Martin Here

More on this collection online

Of Poetry and Protest in Poets & Writers

Michael Warr on The Morning Mixtape discussing Of Poetry and Protest

Of Poetry and Protest Readings

 

 

 

 

 

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