"This work is unlike any other, in its range of rich, conjuring imagery and its dexterity, its smart voice. Carroll-Hackett doesn’t spare us—but doesn’t save us—she draws a blueprint of power and class with her unflinching pivot: matter-of-fact and tender." —Jan Beatty

Posts tagged ‘choice’

Daily Prompt Love <3

14 January 2018

Make art about that door you opened. 

door

 

Daily Prompt Love <3

14 September 2017 

Make art about living with the consequences of a regrettable choice. 

choice

 

15 September 2017

Make art about what the sea says. 

ocean

Daily Prompt Catch-Up <3 All About Some Love and Joy–Gotta Be, In These Dark Days

14 June 2017

Make art about ways of finding (re-finding) your joy.

find your joy

 

15 June 2017

Make art about taking a risk on Love. 

risk to love

 

Daily Prompt Love <3 Yes and No

14 March 2017

“One person saying Yes Yes and another person saying No No, that’s tension.”-Betsy Cox

Make a list of all the things you’d like to say No to, then make a list of everything you’d like to say Yes to. Make art inspired from these lists. 

Yes and No

 

Monday Must Read: Rereading a Needed Classic

Man’s Search for Meaning by Viktor E. Frankl

Psychiatrist Viktor Frankl’s memoir has riveted generations of readers with its descriptions of life in Nazi death camps and its lessons for spiritual survival. Between 1942 and 1945 Frankl labored in four different camps, including Auschwitz, while his parents, brother, and pregnant wife perished. Based on his own experience and the experiences of others he treated later in his practice, Frankl argues that we cannot avoid suffering but we can choose how to cope with it, find meaning in it, and move forward with renewed purpose. Frankl’s theory—known as logotherapy, from the Greek word logos (“meaning“)—holds that our primary drive in life is not pleasure, as Freud maintained, but the discovery and pursuit of what we personally find meaningful.

At the time of Frankl’s death in 1997, Man’s Search for Meaning had sold more than 10 million copies in twenty-four languages. A 1991 reader survey for the Library of Congress that asked readers to name a “book that made a difference in your life” found Man’s Search for Meaning among the ten most influential books in America.

Beacon Press, the original English-language publisher of Man’s Search for Meaning, is issuing this new paperback edition with a new Foreword, biographical Afterword, jacket, price, and classroom materials to reach new generations of readers.

Buy Frankl’s Man’s Search for Meaning (and support an indie press) here: 

http://www.beacon.org/Mans-Search-for-Meaning-P607.aspx

Daily Prompt Catch-Up <3

11/8/2016

Make art about hard choices.

tough-decisions

 

11/9/2016

Make art about not learning the lessons of history.

aldous-huxley-trading-quotes

11/10/2016

Make art about Love as Resistance.

love-resistance

Daily Prompt <3 Facing the Past in Order to Heal

16 August 2016

Many nations with atrocities in their past—Germany, Rwanda, South Africa—prominently recognize their painful history with memorials, museums, and monuments. This kind of trutful recognition, acknowledgement, helps with healing.

We have yet to do that in the United States. As Jessica Leber writes in the linked article below, “Even today, the nation is largely silent about one of its historical periods of shame: the thousands of lynchings that terrorized southern blacks right up until the Civil Rights era.”

We can do this, y’all. We can be brave enough to face our own nightmares. We have to, if we are, as a nation, going to heal and come together. 

“The Equal Justice Initiative, an Alabama organization led by civil rights lawyer Bryan Stevenson, has, for the last few years, been working to place historical markers at lynching sites all around the country. At TED’s conference this week, the group showed a sneak preview of plans for a new national memorial to the victims of lynching that they hope to break ground on some time this year in Montgomery, Alabama.

“In America, we’re not free. We are burdened by a history of racial inequality and injustice. It compromises us. It constrains us,” says Stevenson. “We have to create a new relationship with this history.”

Make art about facing, acknowledging, being accountable for, hard truths about the past.

______________________________________________________________

Read here about a new building project designed to break this national silence.

This Stunning National Memorial Would Recognize America’s Legacy of Lynchings

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