"This work is unlike any other, in its range of rich, conjuring imagery and its dexterity, its smart voice. Carroll-Hackett doesn’t spare us—but doesn’t save us—she draws a blueprint of power and class with her unflinching pivot: matter-of-fact and tender." —Jan Beatty

Posts tagged ‘Justice’

Daily Prompt Love Catch-Up <3 Healing, Exits, & Wisdom From Reverend Barber

2 July 2017

Make art about natural healing.

natural healing

3 July 2017

Make art about your exit strategy.

exit plan

4 July 2017

Make art inspired by this quote from the Reverend Dr. William Barber, II

rev barber

 

Friday Call for Submissions Love <3 J Journal, Seeking Justice Everywhere

J Journal: New Writing on Justice – Fall 2017 Issue

Submissions accepted year-round.

 

J Journal: New Writing on Justice, the John Jay College (CUNY) award-winning litmag, seeks submissions for its Fall 2017 and Spring 2018 issues. Your work should examine justice from any angle, but no straight genre pieces. We prefer the tangential approach to the journal’s theme–the justice question is everywhere.

Send fiction and personal narrative (6000 words max) and poetry (up to three poems) to submissionsjjournal@gmail.com. See jjournal.org for excerpts and more about what we publish. J Journal is a twice-yearly print journal (Fall 2017 is our twentieth issue) with an active online presence.

submit buttom

Daily Prompt Love <3 To Bear Witness

8 June 2017

bear witness

  1.  to show that something exists or is true —+ to His success bears witness to the value of hard work. Rising ticket sales bear witness to the band’s popularity.

  2. formal :  to make a statement saying that one saw or knows something asked to bear witness to the facts She was asked to bear witness at the trial.

Make art about what it means to bear witness. 

Testify

Some Timely Call for Submissions Love <3 Justice

J JOURNAL: NEW WRITING on Justice seeks submissions for its 19th issue.

J Journal seeks new writing – fiction, creative nonfiction (1st person narrative, personal essay, memoir) and poetry – that examines questions of justice.  Although we find that our most powerful pieces relate tangentially to the justice theme, we also welcome work that speaks directly of crime, criminal justice, law and law enforcement.  As a literary project, however, J Journal is less likely to publish straightforward genre fiction.  We encourage writers to approach the justice issue from any angle.

Email up to three poems or up to 6000 words of fiction/nonfiction to: submissionsjjournal@gmail.com

Or send  your submission to:

Editors, J Journal
Department of English
John Jay College of Criminal Justice
524 West 59th Street, 7th Floor
New York, NY 10019

Website:  www.jjournal.org

http://jjournal2.jjay.cuny.edu/jjournal/

 

Must Read–and Must See–Monday: Poetry of Witness

 

poetry-of-witness-posterSomething a little different this week: recommending a documentary, Poetry of Witness. Poetry of Witness is a 2015 documentary film directed by Billy Tooma and Anthony Cirilo about the lives of six contemporary poets who have lived through, and survived, extremities such as war, torture, exile, and repression, using poetry to preserve their memories.It debuted October 16, 2015 at the Buffalo International Film Festival.

The film documents the struggle of six contemporary poets who have faced the duress of war, exile, and human rights violations to give voice to their experiences while wrestling with the complex moral quandaries of artistic production, memory, and trauma. The poets: Carolyn Forché (Salvadoran Civil War), Saghi Ghahraman (Iranian Revolution), Fady Joudah (Doctors Without Borders), Claudia Serea (Socialist Republic of Romania), Mario Susko (Bosnian War), and Bruce Weigl (Vietnam War) offer first-person accounts of how their experiences as soldier, activist, doctor, and survivor imprint their poetry as evidence of those conflicts, rather than as representations of them.

Buy Poetry of Witness: The Documentary

A Couple of Suggested Anthologies (there are so many more…)

Against Forgetting: Twentieth-Century Poetry of Witness

Award winning poet Carolyn Forché spent 13 years compiling Against Forgetting: 20th Century Poetry of Witness. It is an exhaustive and illuminating work of breadth, beauty, wisdom and tragedy.

Poetry of Witness: The Tradition in English, 1500 – 2001

More about the Poetry of Witness

Anthony Cirilo Talks about Poetry of Witness

Carolyn Forché talks about the poetry of witness

Poet Carolyn Forché gathers 500 years of suffering in new anthology

Sandra Beasley: “Flint and Tinder – Understanding the Difference Between ‘Poetry of Witness’ and ‘Documentary Poetics’”

More About Against Forgetting at3Generations

Love y’all. 

Mary

 

 

Because I Needed to Stand in the Light <3

The moon does not fight. It attacks no one. It does not worry. It does not try to crush others. It keeps to its course, but by its very nature, it gently influences. What other body could pull an entire ocean from shore to shore? The moon is faithful to its nature and its power is never diminished.  -Ming-Dao Deng

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Daily Prompt <3 Facing the Past in Order to Heal

16 August 2016

Many nations with atrocities in their past—Germany, Rwanda, South Africa—prominently recognize their painful history with memorials, museums, and monuments. This kind of trutful recognition, acknowledgement, helps with healing.

We have yet to do that in the United States. As Jessica Leber writes in the linked article below, “Even today, the nation is largely silent about one of its historical periods of shame: the thousands of lynchings that terrorized southern blacks right up until the Civil Rights era.”

We can do this, y’all. We can be brave enough to face our own nightmares. We have to, if we are, as a nation, going to heal and come together. 

“The Equal Justice Initiative, an Alabama organization led by civil rights lawyer Bryan Stevenson, has, for the last few years, been working to place historical markers at lynching sites all around the country. At TED’s conference this week, the group showed a sneak preview of plans for a new national memorial to the victims of lynching that they hope to break ground on some time this year in Montgomery, Alabama.

“In America, we’re not free. We are burdened by a history of racial inequality and injustice. It compromises us. It constrains us,” says Stevenson. “We have to create a new relationship with this history.”

Make art about facing, acknowledging, being accountable for, hard truths about the past.

______________________________________________________________

Read here about a new building project designed to break this national silence.

This Stunning National Memorial Would Recognize America’s Legacy of Lynchings

Tag Cloud

%d bloggers like this: