"This work is unlike any other, in its range of rich, conjuring imagery and its dexterity, its smart voice. Carroll-Hackett doesn’t spare us—but doesn’t save us—she draws a blueprint of power and class with her unflinching pivot: matter-of-fact and tender." —Jan Beatty

Posts tagged ‘Native American Poets’

Monday Must Read! Raised by Humans by Deborah Miranda

An enrolled member of the Ohlone-Costanoan Esselen Nation of California, poet Deborah Miranda was born in Los Angeles to an Esselen/Chumash father and a mother of French ancestry. She grew up in Washington State, earning a BS in teaching moderate special-needs children from Wheelock College in 1983 and an MA and PhD in English from the University of Washington. Miranda’s collections of poetry include Raised by Humans (2015); Indian Cartography: Poems (1999), winner of the Diane Decorah Memorial First Book Award from the Native Writers’ Circle of the Americas; and The Zen of La Llorona (2005), nominated for a Lambda Literary Award. Miranda also received the 2000 Writer of the Year Award for Poetry from the Wordcraft Circle of Native Writers and Storytellers. Her mixed-genre collection Bad Indians: A Tribal Memoir (2013) won a Gold Medal from the Independent Publisher’s Association and the PEN Oakland Josephine Miles Literary Award, and was shortlisted for the William Saroyan Award. She teaches at Washington & Lee.

Buy this beautiful book here!

miranda humans

“The poems in Raised by Humans are about surviving childhood and colonization. Childhood did not agree with Deborah Miran­da, mostly because the adult humans in charge of her life were not prepared to manage their own lives, let alone the life of a human-in-training. Humans raised Deborah, but it wasn’t a hu­mane childhood.

This poetry collection is also about how indigenous people survive civilization and become readers and writers of the same alphabet that colonized their culture. The complexity of being forced to find her way into relationship with the very people or cultures that have hurt/raised Miranda is a paradox at the heart of her poetry, which pushes language past what Miranda calls the “alphabet of walls.”

Monday Must Read! Before Language by Susan Deer Cloud

Love this book! 

Buy Before Language Here! 

before language deer cloud

Susan Deer Cloud, a mixed lineage Catskill Indian, is an alumna of Goddard College (MFA) and Binghamton University (B.A. and M.A.). She has taught Creative Writing, Rhetoric and Literature at Binghamton University and Broome Community College. A few years ago she returned to her “heart country” Catskills to dwell once more with foxes, deer, black bears, bald eagles, and the ghosts of panthers and ancestors. She now lives as a full-time mountain woman, dreamer and writer. Deer Cloud is the recipient of various awards and fellowships, including an Elizabeth George Foundation Grant, a National Endowment for the Arts Literature Fellowship, two New York State Foundation for the Arts Fellowships, and a Chenango County Council for the Arts Individual Artist’s Grant. Some of her books are Hunger Moon (Shabda Press); Fox Mountain, The Last Ceremony and Car Stealer (FootHills Publishing); and Braiding Starlight (Split Oak Press). Her poems, stories and essays have been published in anthologies and journals too numerous to name. In order to get out “the voices of the voiceless,” the poet has edited three published anthologies: multicultural Confluence and Native American anthologies I Was Indian (Before Being Indian Was Cool), Volumes I & II; the 2008 Spring Issue of Yellow Medicine Review, a Journal of Indigenous Literature, Art & Thought; and the Re-Matriation Chapbook Series of Indigenous Poetry. She is a member of the international peace organization SERVAS; Poets & Writers; Associated Writing Programs (AWP); and indigenous Wordcraft Circle. She has served on panels at writers’ conferences and given myriad poetry readings at colleges, cultural centers, coffee houses, and other venues. In between her sojourns in the Catskills, Deer Cloud has spent the past few years roving with her life’s companion, John Gunther, around Turtle Island (North America) as well as on the Isles (Iceland, Ireland, Scotland, Wales and England) and Europe

Monday Must Read! Bad Indians by Deborah Miranda

Buy this amazing memoir here

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“This beautiful and devastating book—part tribal history, part lyric and intimate memoir—should be required reading for anyone seeking to learn about California Indian history, past and present. Deborah A. Miranda tells stories of her Ohlone Costanoan Esselen family as well as the experience of California Indians as a whole through oral histories, newspaper clippings, anthropological recordings, personal reflections, and poems. The result is a work of literary art that is wise, angry, and playful all at once, a compilation that will break your heart and teach you to see the world anew.”

An enrolled member of the Ohlone-Costanoan Esselen Nation of California, poet Deborah Miranda was born in Los Angeles to an Esselen/Chumash father and a mother of French ancestry. She grew up in Washington State, earning a BS in teaching moderate special-needs children from Wheelock College in 1983 and an MA and PhD in English from the University of Washington. Miranda’s collections of poetry include Raised by Humans (2015); Indian Cartography: Poems (1999), winner of the Diane Decorah Memorial First Book Award from the Native Writers’ Circle of the Americas; and The Zen of La Llorona (2005), nominated for a Lambda Literary Award. Miranda also received the 2000 Writer of the Year Award for Poetry from the Wordcraft Circle of Native Writers and Storytellers. Her mixed-genre collection Bad Indians: A Tribal Memoir (2013) won a Gold Medal from the Independent Publisher’s Association and the PEN Oakland Josephine Miles Literary Award, and was shortlisted for the William Saroyan Award.

Praise for Bad Indians

”Essential for all of us who were taught in school that the ‘Mission Indians’ no longer existed in California, Bad Indianscombines tribal and family histories, tape recordings, and the writings of a white ethnologist who spoke with Miranda’s family, together with photographs, old reports from the mission priests to their bishops, and newspaper articles concerning Indians from the nearby white settlements. Miranda takes us on a journey to locate herself by way of the stories of her ancestors and others who come alive through her writing. It’s such a fine book that a few words can’t do it justice.”
–Leslie Marmon Silko, author of Ceremony and The Turquoise Ledge

Bad Indiansbrings the human story of California’s indigenous community sharply into focus. It’s a narrative long obscured and distorted by celebrations of Christian missionaries and phony stories about civilization coming to a golden land. No other history of California’s indigenous communities that I know of presents such a moving, personal account of loss and survival.”
–Frederick E. Hoxie, Swanlund Professor, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

”For so long, Native writers and readers have opened books of our tribal history, archaeology, or anthropology and found that it is not the story we know. It does not include the people we know. It does not tell the stories of the heart or the relationships that were, and are, significant in any time. When we write our own books, they do not fit the ‘record,’ as created by and confirmed by outside views. From the voice of the silenced, the written about and not written by, this book is groundbreaking not only as literature but as history.”
–Linda Hogan, author of Rounding the Human Corners and a faculty member for the Indigenous Education Institute

Also check out Ms. Miranda’s collection of poetry, Raised by Humans. 

Happy reading! 

 

Monday Must Read! Monty Campbell Jr: A Large Dent in the Moon

monty campbellMeet Monty Campbell Jr, author of Train through the Video Game (Shabda Press) and A Large Dent in the Moon(Foothills). Monty is a member of the Cayuga Tribe of the Six Nations. He grew up in and around Gowanda, NY, the Cattaraugus Reservation and Rochester, NY’s inner city. His work is also included in the indigenous poets anthology, I was Indian (FootHills Publishing, 2009) and Simpatico, On the Road (Simpatico, 2009).

Buy A Large Dent in the Moon!

http://www.foothillspublishing.com/2011/id21.htm

Praise for A Large Dent in the Moon

Erupting from the junkyards, dead eyed alleys and psycho-babble of our raped and compromised Turtle Island, Monty Campbell, Jr., incandescently stands for truth in all its flawed magnificence. A Large Dent in the Moon is a clarion call to non-Indians and Indians alike to get it together before we drown in a tsunami of exploitation, lies and mediocrity. Monty Campbell is a wichasha wakan for our times.  I’ve had the great fortune of reading through his book three times now and each time I was left shattered, awed and breathless.  May these poems be the first of many such incantations.~Paul Hapenny

This first book by Monty Campbell, Jr. makes a large dent, indeed.  Careening around every corner the reader finds startling metaphors, precision line-breaks, and enough poetic arsenal to supply NASA’s next mission.  Monty’s “music slides / through the genetic / garbage of a / Rochester alley…” His poems are Manifestos / written on / cell phones / portraits of / everyday / struggle” and “Rez Photos” where “all the skin is brown, / weighed / and forgiven…”  These poems are alternately sensual, despairing, angry, hopeful, but always crafted with love out of three decades of survival on the real side of America’s tracks.  If Lou Reed is correct that it takes a “Busload of Faith to get by,” here it is, achieving lift-off.~John Roche

From the Introduction:

I think that never have I read work by an indigenous writer in which so much is said about the beauty of Earth filtered through palimpsest-images of city, ghost streets, train tracks, and litter forced upon Turtle Island and our planet altogether.  It is beauty conveyed through loss.  I literally hurt when I read Monty’s poetry.  Yet, as I state in my blurb, Monty’s poems have led me to understand something about love which I never understood before.  When you read this book, I trust you will get why I cannot paraphrase any poems herein; doing so would strip the tropes, deep song, and enfolding spaces of their haunting realness, evocations and dreamscapes (if not nightmare-scapes).  It would do dishonor to that love.~Susan Deer Cloud

Read More From Monty Online

http://www.alestlelive.com/lifestyles/article_da20c15c-2faa-11e3-9855-0019bb30f31a.html

https://spaceslitmag.wordpress.com/2013/01/12/writers-reading-monty-campbell-jr/

http://www.amerinda.org/talkingstick/15-2/

 

 

Happy Reading!

xo

Mary

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