"This work is unlike any other, in its range of rich, conjuring imagery and its dexterity, its smart voice. Carroll-Hackett doesn’t spare us—but doesn’t save us—she draws a blueprint of power and class with her unflinching pivot: matter-of-fact and tender." —Jan Beatty

Posts tagged ‘ancestors’

Daily Prompt Love <3 Ancestral Traditions

1 February 2018

Celebrating Imbolc, the day of the Celtic goddess Brigid that marks the beginning of spring.

Imbolc, also known as the Feast of Brigid, celebrates the arrival of longer, warmer days and the early signs of spring on February 1.

It is one of the four major “fire” festivals (quarter days, referred to in Irish mythology from medieval Irish texts. The other three festivals on the old Irish calendar are Beltane, Lughnasadh, and Samhain – Halloween).

The word Imbolc means literally “in the belly” in the old Irish Neolithic language, referring to the pregnancy of ewes.

St. Brigid is the patron saint of babies, blacksmiths, boatmen, cattle farmers, children whose parents are not married, children whose mothers are mistreated by the children’s fathers, Clan Douglas, dairymaids, dairy workers, fugitives, Ireland, Leinster, mariners, midwives, milkmaids, nuns, poets, the poor, poultry farmers, poultry raisers, printing presses, sailors, scholars, travelers, and watermen. Here’s a busy saint!

One folk tradition that continues in some homes on St. Brigid’s Day (or Imbolc) is that of the Brigid’s Bed. The girls and young unmarried women of the household or village create a corn dolly to represent Brigid, called the Brideog (“little Brigid” or “young Brigid”), adorning it with ribbons and baubles like shells or stones. They make a bed for the Brideog to lie in…..” (from Irish Central)

Read more traditional ways of celebrating Imbolc, St. Brigid’s Day, here

Make art about ancestral traditions. 

st brigid

 

Daily Prompt Love <3 Diaspora In the Blood

13 January 2018

Thinking a lot about the ancestors, about how my DNA report reads like a mini United Nations, about the courage and desperation and desire they must have felt, possessed, to leave their homelands, from eleven different regions of the globe, leaving all they knew, for all kinds of reasons, some forced and others willing, escaping starvation, violence, but all without any idea of what lay before them.

Did they all know they would never go home again? What will it must have taken to survive. Do I carry that same strength of will? Do I honor what it took, what they went through. with my own life? A life I owe them? 

Make art about who dances in your blood. 

DNA me

Daily Prompt Love <3 Honoring

13 November 2017

Today is my late husband’s birthday, and the anniversary of my baby brother walking on to the next life. So to celebrate them, today, I launched a new literary magazine, K’in. 

They filled my life with so much beauty and humor and wisdom and joy. It only seems right to honor them by creating something beautiful. 

Make art about honoring the dead. 

bear-woman_1986 (2)

Daily Prompt Love <3 What We Inherit

10 October 2017

Make art inspired by this quote: 

When born you inherit what’s burning.~Liam Rector 

liam

Daily Prompt Love <3 Comfort & Legacy

12 September 2017

Make art about leaving your comfort zone. 

comfort zone

13 September 2017

Make art about what you want to leave behind. 

footprint-1021452_640

Daily Prompt Love <3 Another Time

25 May 2017

Been reading and thinking a lot lately about vintage sewing, about work done by hands in the countless generations before me. 

Make art about feeling connected to something from another era, another time. Reveal this connection through a specific daily process or specific object. 

 

Daily Prompt Love <3 Ways of Knowing

30 April 2017

I asked for a dream before going to sleep last night, a dream that would help me to solve a problem, answer a question I had. In the ways in which I was raised, dreams were just one of multiple ways of learning, ways of knowing.

Unlike mainstream Western culture, which tends to limit ‘knowing’ to what is categorized as ‘rational,’ indigenous cultures across the globe recognize multiple sources of knowledge an individual or community possess and can access, including traditional wisdom, dreaming, land knowing, symbols and images, shared knowledge through connectivity, and story, among others.

Make art about ways of knowing. 

ways of knowing

 

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