"This work is unlike any other, in its range of rich, conjuring imagery and its dexterity, its smart voice. Carroll-Hackett doesn’t spare us—but doesn’t save us—she draws a blueprint of power and class with her unflinching pivot: matter-of-fact and tender." —Jan Beatty

Posts tagged ‘ancestral memory’

Daily Prompt Love <3 She

11 June 2019

Make art about the wisdom of old women, about the dangerous old woman. 

old woman

Image by Gerd Altmann from Pixabay

Monday Must Read! Dark Roots by Caroline Malone

Caroline Malone was born and lives in the foothills of the Great Smoky Mountains in East Tennessee.  A graduate of The University of Tennessee with a B.A. in English and Classics, she earned the MFA in Writing and Literature from the Bennington Writing Seminars. Her poems have appeared in Boulevard, The Dos Passos Review, Women’s Voices, Women Period, Heartwood, and others. The collection Dark Roots explores the meaning of family, heritage, and identity. Currently, she teaches writing and literature at South College in Knoxville, TN. She also plays Irish traditional music on the bouzouki, mandolin, guitar, concertina, and fiddle.

Purchase Dark Roots Here!

Malone-Caroline-WEB-600x600

Stark and haunting, these poems dig deep to the roots of identity and the self.”Julia Watts, author of Gifted and Talented

I know how things sink in;” drawing deeply from the ancient land, the collective soul that hums beneath her feet, and in her words, Caroline Malone does, indeed, know, and reveals to us that knowing, of fear and prayer and loss, of the paths we make to seek—and find—our own souls, even when they seem to flee from us, into the history of the secret city of Oak Ridge, to the rubble at the feet of the Parthenon, into the arms of the Civil War ghosts who linger at the shoulders of every Southerner. -Mary Carroll-Hackett, author of (Un)Hinged, Death for Beginners, A Little Blood, A Little Rain, and The Night I Heard Everything.

Daily Prompt Love <3 The Procession

12 May 2019 

Make art about the procession of women, about women ancestors, about the shoulders we stand on. 

art-3180251_640

Image by Richard Mcall from Pixabay

Daily Prompt Love <3 Blood

18 February 2019 

There is blood, there, he says
                    Blood here too, down here, she says
                    Only blood, the Blood Mother sings – Juan Felipe Herrera
Make art about what the blood remembers. 
blood

Daily Prompt Love <3 Land, Memory

8 February 2019

Make art about what the land remembers. 

tree

Daily Prompt Love x 3

17 March 2018

Make art about the ancestors.

Fr Bill and Grandpa and me

 

 

18 March 2018

Make art about a chance encounter with a stranger.

stranger

19 March 2018

Make art waking caught still in a dream.

edges of a dream

Daily Prompt Love <3 Ancestral Traditions

1 February 2018

Celebrating Imbolc, the day of the Celtic goddess Brigid that marks the beginning of spring.

Imbolc, also known as the Feast of Brigid, celebrates the arrival of longer, warmer days and the early signs of spring on February 1.

It is one of the four major “fire” festivals (quarter days, referred to in Irish mythology from medieval Irish texts. The other three festivals on the old Irish calendar are Beltane, Lughnasadh, and Samhain – Halloween).

The word Imbolc means literally “in the belly” in the old Irish Neolithic language, referring to the pregnancy of ewes.

St. Brigid is the patron saint of babies, blacksmiths, boatmen, cattle farmers, children whose parents are not married, children whose mothers are mistreated by the children’s fathers, Clan Douglas, dairymaids, dairy workers, fugitives, Ireland, Leinster, mariners, midwives, milkmaids, nuns, poets, the poor, poultry farmers, poultry raisers, printing presses, sailors, scholars, travelers, and watermen. Here’s a busy saint!

One folk tradition that continues in some homes on St. Brigid’s Day (or Imbolc) is that of the Brigid’s Bed. The girls and young unmarried women of the household or village create a corn dolly to represent Brigid, called the Brideog (“little Brigid” or “young Brigid”), adorning it with ribbons and baubles like shells or stones. They make a bed for the Brideog to lie in…..” (from Irish Central)

Read more traditional ways of celebrating Imbolc, St. Brigid’s Day, here

Make art about ancestral traditions. 

st brigid

 

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