"This work is unlike any other, in its range of rich, conjuring imagery and its dexterity, its smart voice. Carroll-Hackett doesn’t spare us—but doesn’t save us—she draws a blueprint of power and class with her unflinching pivot: matter-of-fact and tender." —Jan Beatty

Posts tagged ‘work’

Reading Series for Virginia Womxn Writers! Call for Submissions!

Womxn at Red Door 104: Words & Art

A New Reading Series Celebrating Virginia Womxn, Womxn-Identifying, Genderfluid, Genderqueer, & Nonbinary-Identifying Writers

red door logo

Womxn at Red Door 104: Words and Art, created to celebrate Virginia womxn writers, is a partnership between Creative Writing at Longwood University and Red Door 104, a unique gallery and art learning center owned and operated by the tireless and talented Audrey Sullivan,  in historic downtown Farmville,Virginia.

The series will consist of two events annually:

  • A reading and reception in April 2020, with two featured readers and five cameo readers.
  • All selected readers will then also have the unique and exciting experience of having visual art created by central Virginia artists in response to their submitted work. This art will be revealed in a second event, an art opening at Red Door 104 the following October.

The first Womxn at Red Door 104 reading will take place from 2-4 pm on Saturday, April 4, 2020. The art opening will take place in October 2020, date tba.

Selected writers must be available to read in person, and should be willing to attend both events.

Believing that artists should be compensated when possible, we will award all selected readers a small token honorarium.

Please submit writing samples, as detailed below, along with a 50-75 word bio, via Submittable. Please include in your bio your current Virginia city of residence.

Submissions are limited to current Virginia residents.

Send us your best! We’re looking for work that is visually rich, and that will make for a compelling live reading.

Full Submission Details Here! 

 

Friday Call for Submissions Love <3 The Festival

The Festival Seeking New and Diverse Voices for Fall Issue

Deadline: Rolling

The Festival Review seeks new and diverse voices in literature and media arts for upcoming Fall 2019 issue. Anything under 5k words accepted. No special formatting required. Free to submit. Small stipend paid  to contributors. Submit or inquire to thefestivalreview@gmail.com 

Visit the website here!  

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Daily Prompt Love <3 In the Eye

6 September 2019 

Make art about the hurricane, literal or metaphorical, about evacuating, or choosing to ride out the storm, about standing in the eye of the storm.

hurricanes

Image by WikiImages from Pixabay

Daily Prompt Love <3 Mea Culpa

5 September 2019 

Make art about apology, given or received. 

sorry

 

Daily Prompt Love <3 That Pedestal

4 September 2019 

Make art about what’s being exalted. 

exalt

 

Daily Prompt Love <3 Extra Sensory

3 September 2019 

Make art about a psychic experience. 

psychic

Image by kalhh from Pixabay

Monday Must Read! Raised by Humans by Deborah Miranda

An enrolled member of the Ohlone-Costanoan Esselen Nation of California, poet Deborah Miranda was born in Los Angeles to an Esselen/Chumash father and a mother of French ancestry. She grew up in Washington State, earning a BS in teaching moderate special-needs children from Wheelock College in 1983 and an MA and PhD in English from the University of Washington. Miranda’s collections of poetry include Raised by Humans (2015); Indian Cartography: Poems (1999), winner of the Diane Decorah Memorial First Book Award from the Native Writers’ Circle of the Americas; and The Zen of La Llorona (2005), nominated for a Lambda Literary Award. Miranda also received the 2000 Writer of the Year Award for Poetry from the Wordcraft Circle of Native Writers and Storytellers. Her mixed-genre collection Bad Indians: A Tribal Memoir (2013) won a Gold Medal from the Independent Publisher’s Association and the PEN Oakland Josephine Miles Literary Award, and was shortlisted for the William Saroyan Award. She teaches at Washington & Lee.

Buy this beautiful book here!

miranda humans

“The poems in Raised by Humans are about surviving childhood and colonization. Childhood did not agree with Deborah Miran­da, mostly because the adult humans in charge of her life were not prepared to manage their own lives, let alone the life of a human-in-training. Humans raised Deborah, but it wasn’t a hu­mane childhood.

This poetry collection is also about how indigenous people survive civilization and become readers and writers of the same alphabet that colonized their culture. The complexity of being forced to find her way into relationship with the very people or cultures that have hurt/raised Miranda is a paradox at the heart of her poetry, which pushes language past what Miranda calls the “alphabet of walls.”

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